Deep Sea Fish by Chi Hui

“Deep Sea Fish,” by Chi Hui (translated by Brian Bies) is a novelet from the March/April 2018 issue of the Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction. At its core, it’s a story about what it means to be human, and what it means to reach for the stars. Many of us SFF nerds grew up familiar with “The Martian Chronicles;” stories about the inhabitants of other planets interacting with, or being discovered long dead by, humans are a staple of SFF. “Deep Sea Fish” features a galaxy spanning civilization (not carbon based!) that has flourished on other planets and then vanished. Human archeologists studying ancient alien artifacts and remains are absolutely a strongly present theme in this genre, and in “Deep Sea Fish” there’s a group that’s moving quickly to study an area of interest on Titan before a company comes in to terraform the area, and melt it all… as opposed to coming in to build a new high way or condo and bulldozing it all.. The science in this novelet is a little bit shaky, one of the things where you just have to nod and enjoy the substance of the story and the themes it contains. What…

“Big Girl” by Meg Elison

“Big Girl,” by Meg Elison, is a short story in the Nov/Dec 2017 issue of The Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction. The premise is simple: a teen aged girl is found, naked and enormous. Her giant bare body is exposed to the entire world; she cannot find clothing that fits; people stare at her and try to photograph her breasts and genitals to post online as porn; people write erotica about her, her personally, her the real person; people comment on the size and shape of her body; she is treated as dangerous, and a financial drain. Other than her immense size this is pretty much the teen girl experience, quite frankly. You are subject to constant scrutiny and measurement and are somehow inherently dangerous and of course it’s your fault for being so. She manages to escape the attention by, literally, escaping. This teen aged girl has to leave the entire world she knows, and her family, to sequester herself on an island where she lives nude eating raw flesh until she begins shrinking again. When she’s “normal sized” she is able to rejoin society. As she ages, of course, she starts shrinking; vanishing from view, one might…

“Likho,” by Andy Stewart

“Likho,” by Andy Stewart, is a speculative fantasy near-future/alternate present novella about a young woman who goes somewhere she shouldn’t and learns something she shouldn’t… just as she did as a child. Set in Pripyat, Ukraine, the story follows Sonya as she travels into the Forbidden Zone in search of a mural that is rumored to change on repeat viewings, slowly revealing the story of what happened and the children who were abandoned there. Like the abandoned children, Sonya was adopted. She feels some kind of link with them. And as she studies the mural the link feels ever more real. “Likho” is a great story, well told. Sonya is an interesting character who is fleshed out fully yet subtly. Although Stewart doesn’t have the space of a novel to introduce us to her, it’s still easy to get a feel for who she is and what motivates her. As bits of her past are unfolded, it makes sense why someone who seems so grounded and full of common sense would trapise into a radiation zone and then take a drug that allows one to see the future (or maybe the past). (the drug is called yaga and it turns…