“Bacchae,” by Erin Horáková
2017 Publication , 4 star , short story / April 18, 2018

“Bacchae,” by Erin Horáková, is a very short story about a very big issue. The title is taken from Euripedes’ play, which shows two twinned but opposing sides: order and rationality versus Dionysian instinct. Without this wild instinct, this impulse, this influence of Dionysus… humans suffer. When it’s suppressed it turns dark and chaotic, destructive. Dionysus, angered, inspires his Bacchanates to run wild and attack men and cattle, to steal, to destroy what’s in their path. Bethan, drunk and leaning against a wall, begins attacking the concrete wall. She does more harm to herself than to the wall, and her equally drunk from Angharad intervenes and tries to pull her away, calls the cops to get her to safety. Bethan is wild, bleeding, but once fully parted from the wall and tucked into a police car she goes limp and compliant… although still very aware of that wall. At the hospital, they don’t find anything WRONG with her, and Bethan is released. She, Angharad, and Bethan’s mom head straight back to the wall. The wall is surrounded with wild women eager to beat that wall, to pull it down, to destroy it. I’m not familiar with London, but I live…

“From a Certain Point of View,” Anthology
2017 Publication , 3 star , anthology / April 18, 2018

“From a Certain Point of View” is a Star Wars anthology covering the experiences of characters who are predominantly minor (but also Yoda is in there, is he really a minor character?). The title, of course, riffs on Obi-Wan Kenobi’s “from a certain point of view” line, the one that tries to spackle deep meaning over George Lucas’ make-it-up-fast writing. Vader as Luke’s (and Leia’s) father, of course, was a twist ending that he didn’t think of during the first movie. Kenobi is, narratively, an unreliable witness. Most people are. “From a Certain Point of View” shows us a bunch of other witnesses, to various things, that may or may not be reliable. Like most anthologies, it’s a little uneven. The good stories were very good, though. A few standouts include: “The Sith of Datawork” by Ken Liu, which explains why the escape pod containing the Death Star Plans was jettisoned without being immediately recalled, and goes into institutional paperwork and how it can really gum up an operation. It’s a good, fun story that digs into what really makes the Empire move: data and forms and paperwork, filled out in triplicate. “Stories in the Sand,” by Griffin McElroy, which…