“From a Certain Point of View,” Anthology
2017 Publication , 3 star , anthology / April 18, 2018

“From a Certain Point of View” is a Star Wars anthology covering the experiences of characters who are predominantly minor (but also Yoda is in there, is he really a minor character?). The title, of course, riffs on Obi-Wan Kenobi’s “from a certain point of view” line, the one that tries to spackle deep meaning over George Lucas’ make-it-up-fast writing. Vader as Luke’s (and Leia’s) father, of course, was a twist ending that he didn’t think of during the first movie. Kenobi is, narratively, an unreliable witness. Most people are. “From a Certain Point of View” shows us a bunch of other witnesses, to various things, that may or may not be reliable. Like most anthologies, it’s a little uneven. The good stories were very good, though. A few standouts include: “The Sith of Datawork” by Ken Liu, which explains why the escape pod containing the Death Star Plans was jettisoned without being immediately recalled, and goes into institutional paperwork and how it can really gum up an operation. It’s a good, fun story that digs into what really makes the Empire move: data and forms and paperwork, filled out in triplicate. “Stories in the Sand,” by Griffin McElroy, which…

“Where Would You Be Now” by Carrie Vaughn

“Where Would You Be Now,” by Carrie Vaughn, is a post-apocolyptic story about a group of medical professionals and amateurs who travel around patching people up and delivering babies while also defending their base of operations and looking for food and supplies. It’s a prequel to Vaughn’s novel “Bannerless.” “Where Would You Be Now” depicts what feels like a pretty accurate post-apocolyptic world. There’s a lot of filthy people banding together, some are opportunists looking to take advantage of others by any (violent) means necessary, there isn’t a lot of food, it’s hard to grow food, people are dying in child birth, and babies don’t tend to live very long because they starve. People also spend time both reminiscing (wow, I sure miss golfing on nicely manicured greens), and regretting (if only things hadn’t gone to hell, I’d be doing X, Y, or Z. What would YOU be doing?). It’s implied that a lot of people were killed (one guy’s concerned with “repopulating the earth”) but there’s enough people to strip stores bare of canned goods and various products. The clinic that the protagonist, Kath, and her partners live and work out of is protected by fences and barbed wire…

Deep Sea Fish by Chi Hui

“Deep Sea Fish,” by Chi Hui (translated by Brian Bies) is a novelet from the March/April 2018 issue of the Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction. At its core, it’s a story about what it means to be human, and what it means to reach for the stars. Many of us SFF nerds grew up familiar with “The Martian Chronicles;” stories about the inhabitants of other planets interacting with, or being discovered long dead by, humans are a staple of SFF. “Deep Sea Fish” features a galaxy spanning civilization (not carbon based!) that has flourished on other planets and then vanished. Human archeologists studying ancient alien artifacts and remains are absolutely a strongly present theme in this genre, and in “Deep Sea Fish” there’s a group that’s moving quickly to study an area of interest on Titan before a company comes in to terraform the area, and melt it all… as opposed to coming in to build a new high way or condo and bulldozing it all.. The science in this novelet is a little bit shaky, one of the things where you just have to nod and enjoy the substance of the story and the themes it contains. What…