“Worth her Weight in Gold” by Sarah Gailey
2018 Publication , 3 star , female author , Tor / April 26, 2018

“Worth Her Weight in Gold,” by Sarah Gailey, is about a man and his hippo. Specifically it’s about Winslow Remington Houndstooth and his hippo, Ruby, who is his faithful companion and steed and who just isn’t cooperating when it’s time to high tail it outta there after one of his bloody but lucrative heists. And how do you MAKE a hippo do something that hippo doesn’t want to do? Hippos are huge, fast, and have big deadly teeth and also horns. Hippos can mess you up. Especially when they’re in pain. Which Ruby is. It’s a very short story, more a character piece than anything, about the love a man can have for his hippo and the price he’s willing to pay for his health. It’s also, a little bit, about kintsugi. But mostly it’s about love. I have a feeling that true enjoyment of this story requires having read Gailey’s novels “River of Teeth” and “Taste of Marrow.” This short story is a nice appetizer for them, leaving me wanting more.I was able to enjoy the story without having read the novels, which is always a plus. Leave a comment if you HAVE read the novels. What’d you think?…

“Where Would You Be Now” by Carrie Vaughn

“Where Would You Be Now,” by Carrie Vaughn, is a post-apocolyptic story about a group of medical professionals and amateurs who travel around patching people up and delivering babies while also defending their base of operations and looking for food and supplies. It’s a prequel to Vaughn’s novel “Bannerless.” “Where Would You Be Now” depicts what feels like a pretty accurate post-apocolyptic world. There’s a lot of filthy people banding together, some are opportunists looking to take advantage of others by any (violent) means necessary, there isn’t a lot of food, it’s hard to grow food, people are dying in child birth, and babies don’t tend to live very long because they starve. People also spend time both reminiscing (wow, I sure miss golfing on nicely manicured greens), and regretting (if only things hadn’t gone to hell, I’d be doing X, Y, or Z. What would YOU be doing?). It’s implied that a lot of people were killed (one guy’s concerned with “repopulating the earth”) but there’s enough people to strip stores bare of canned goods and various products. The clinic that the protagonist, Kath, and her partners live and work out of is protected by fences and barbed wire…

“Played Your Eyes,” by Jonathan Carroll
2018 Publication , 4 star , short story , Tor / April 12, 2018

“Played your Eyes,” by Jonathan Carroll, is a short story about a woman who receives an unusual bequest from an abusive ex. The protagonist is minding her own business one day when she gets word from a lawyer that her ex has died and left her something in his will. Curious, she contacts him to find out what she’d inherited. He had money, after all, and he could be generous when not being cruel. To her consternation she finds that he’d left her his lovely, flowing handwriting. She doesn’t believe this at first, but soon finds that it’s literally true. She’s able to swap her own pigeon-footprint (like chicken scratch, but different) handwriting with his. She goes between the two for a while before finally giving in and using his handwriting all the time. But how can you bequeath someone something as personal, and insubstantial, as hand writing? And why? As her life unfolds, the protagonist finds that her life is smoother and calmer than it was with her ex. She finds a man who she loves, and who loves her in return and treats her well. But the handwriting thing continues to be a source of weirdness in her…

“Angel of the Blockade” by Alex Wells
2017 Publication , Novelet , Tor / January 6, 2018

“Angel of the Blockade” is a novelette by Alex Wells, published on Tor in September of 2017. The thing you need to know about Alex Wells is that they’re a huge freaking nerd. And when you have a nerd who’s immersed in nerd culture in deep, pervasive ways they can either be really entitled creeps, or they can create magic. Wells absolutely creates magic. “Angel of the Blockade” picks up a lot of really classic science fiction tropes– a hard bitten cynic with a heart of gold smuggler who also has an actual history and character beyond that; a pilot who interacts with the world in ways most people can’t (tasting solar winds, for example); pilgrim refugees persecuted because of religion and driven to find a new planet home; the idea of home in general. Wells takes this, and they turn it into something that feels new and unique, something personal. Nata, the protagonist, was raised and nurtured by her aunt after the tragic death of her parents… and their death IS tragic and is more than just emotional manipulation, and profoundly shaped who she is and how she does what she does and why. A freighter pilot and smuggler,…