Sometimes you walk past the ‘new books’ section at the library and pick up a book because the cover is pretty. And then you start reading the book and have to take frequent breaks because the book is so powerful and emotional. And then after you’re finished reading it you have to take a break and not read anything else for a while. This is what happened when I read Jennifer Zeynab Joukhadar’s “The Map of Salt and Sta...

I’m a fan of the series and have been following Allison’s work since the earliest days of his online comics, “Bobbins,” in the late 90s. His comic series “Giant Days” lives up to my expectations. Vol 8 continues the story of Esther, Susan, and Daisy. Preparing for the next term and the expiration of their housing lease, the three face the splintering of their cozy group as two of the three look into moving in w...

If I weren’t such a John Allison fan I’d rate Non Pratt’s prose volume of “Giant Days” a bit higher, but Pratt can’t quite measure up and doesn’t fully capture Allison’s tone. That said it’s a solid piece of work that continues to explore the relationship of Esther, Daisy, and Susan as well as go into their own histories and needs. Pratt covers some of Susan’s emotional motivation, why s...

“The Boy at the Keyhole,” by Stephen Giles, is a thriller set in post-war England, at the manor house of a once wealthy family. Nine year old Samuel is a half orphan, his father dead from a tragic fall. His beloved mother has gone to the USA to try to secure investment capital in their failing business… or has she? As housekeeper Ruth gets increasingly dictatorial he starts wondering more and more whether his mother is actually ...

“The Au Pair,” by Emma Rous, follows Seraphine Mayes as she works to untangle the true story of her parentage and the reason her grandmother seems to prefer her twin brother, Danny, over her. Is there a mystery as to her true parentage? Is that what her father was hinting at when he said he needed to talk to all the kids just before he died unexpectedly in a home repair accident? Or is she just overwrought with grief and lashing out, ...

“Schrodinger’s Dog” is a very fine short story stretched out over the course of a novel, filled with tedious exposition and infodumps that detract heavily from the ideas of the book which involve time travel and killing/not killing a dog. I won this book in a Goodreads Giveaway. “Schrodinger’s Dog,” a book with an exciting summary of its plot, fails utterly to live up to the expectations it raises. A book about...

“The Summer Wives,” by Beatriz Williams, is the story of new money, old money, and no money colliding on an island in the north east coast, told primarily from the point of view of the wealthy (by marrying into it) Miranda. As she spends her first summer on Winthrop Island, among people who’ve been summering their for generations and among the people who live there year round, she’s swept up in the wake of her dramatic new...

“Caged,” by Ellison Cooper, is a fast paced thriller about FBI neuroscientist Sayer Altair, who winds up leading the hunt for an especially twisted serial killer. Said serial killer is kidnapping young women and locking them in cages, dosing them with psychoactive drugs, priming them with mythology about death and dying, and then starving them. It’s a long, slow, scary way to die. Altair and her team are eager to end the cycle o...

Oh my god. I won “The Ghost Script” by Jules Feiffer in a good reads giveaway and my very excited opinion is honestly mine. “The Ghost Script” is the third book in a trilogy. If I’d realized that I wouldn’t have entered the contest, as I haven’t read the first two and it can be hard to jump into a series partway through without knowing what’s gone before. But I’m really glad that I entered the...

“The King’s Justice” is a medieval murder mystery/thriller by E. M. Powell, the first in a new series and thus a good jumping on point for people who are interested in murder mysteries/thrillers set in the medieval period. I won this book in a goodreads giveaway and this review is my own opinion. Content Note: threatened sexual assault to more than one party, domestic violence It’s 1176 and Aelred Barling, a clerk in the t...

“Cutting Teeth,” by Kirsty Logan

“Cutting Teeth,” by Kirsty Logan, is a story about choices; in many ways it’s about the choices that we all make as we enter adulthood, as we live and stretch in relationships. It’s a story about potential. It’s a story about men and women. The narrator is reminiscing, or spinning a story, or simply narrating, the story of their conception and the life of them and their parents prior to their birth. The chi...

‘Logistics,’ by A. J. Fitzwater

“Logistics,” by A. J. Fitzwater, is the story of one person’s post-apocalyptic quest for tampons. And food, water, shelter, etc. But tampons are key. “Logistics” follows Enfys, a non-binary AFAB individual who was in the middle of top surgery when a super powerful flesh eating bacteria got of hand, sweeping across the Earth. They were hastily stitched up after a partial mastectomy, cared for by a nurse who ...

“Where Would You Be Now” by Carrie Vaughn

“Where Would You Be Now,” by Carrie Vaughn, is a post-apocolyptic story about a group of medical professionals and amateurs who travel around patching people up and delivering babies while also defending their base of operations and looking for food and supplies. It’s a prequel to Vaughn’s novel “Bannerless.” “Where Would You Be Now” depicts what feels like a pretty accurate post-apocolypt...

“Played Your Eyes,” by Jonathan Carroll
2018 Publication , 4 star , short story , Tor / April 12, 2018

“Played your Eyes,” by Jonathan Carroll, is a short story about a woman who receives an unusual bequest from an abusive ex. The protagonist is minding her own business one day when she gets word from a lawyer that her ex has died and left her something in his will. Curious, she contacts him to find out what she’d inherited. He had money, after all, and he could be generous when not being cruel. To her consternation she...

The Next to the Last of the Mohegans by Joseph Bruchac

“The Next to the Last of the Mohegans,” by Joseph Bruchac, is an Own Voices story about a young Mohegan man named Billy and his trouble-making mad scientist best friend. Just about every culture has stories about little people, or fairies, or spirits, or small gods, or beings that aren’t quite human. Although a lot of modern culture has spun stories of these beings to be light and cute and benevolent they generally hav...

A Dog of Wu by Ted Rabinowitz

“A Dog of Wu,” by Ted Rabinowitz, is a novelet set in the future following the collapse of the society we know and the formation of another… a society shaped by eugenics and absolute control over everyone beneath The Wu, control by both training and by chemical influence. In the story there are two groups of humans: “feral humans” who haven’t engaged in strict gene manipulation and genetic lines (clon...

Deep Sea Fish by Chi Hui

“Deep Sea Fish,” by Chi Hui (translated by Brian Bies) is a novelet from the March/April 2018 issue of the Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction. At its core, it’s a story about what it means to be human, and what it means to reach for the stars. Many of us SFF nerds grew up familiar with “The Martian Chronicles;” stories about the inhabitants of other planets interacting with, or being discovered long de...

“Big Girl” by Meg Elison

“Big Girl,” by Meg Elison, is a short story in the Nov/Dec 2017 issue of The Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction. The premise is simple: a teen aged girl is found, naked and enormous. Her giant bare body is exposed to the entire world; she cannot find clothing that fits; people stare at her and try to photograph her breasts and genitals to post online as porn; people write erotica about her, her personally, her the re...

“Likho,” by Andy Stewart

“Likho,” by Andy Stewart, is a speculative fantasy near-future/alternate present novella about a young woman who goes somewhere she shouldn’t and learns something she shouldn’t… just as she did as a child. Set in Pripyat, Ukraine, the story follows Sonya as she travels into the Forbidden Zone in search of a mural that is rumored to change on repeat viewings, slowly revealing the story of what happened and t...

“Aground, Upon the Sand” by Jennifer R. Donohue

Aground, Upon the Sand, by Jennifer R. Donohue is a short piece that took first place in Syntax & Salt Magazine’s Fall Flash Contest. If this were a longer piece I’d consider this a spoiler, but it’s pretty short so you’ll get there soon… and if you’re a big oceanic mythology person you’ll figure it out a few sentences in. The narrator of the story is a Selkie, who lost her skin during a st...